A comparison of themes in the catcher in the rye and pygmalion

Pygmalion Pygmalion Professor Higgins is seen throughout Pygmalion as a very rude man.

A comparison of themes in the catcher in the rye and pygmalion

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Alienation as a Form of Self-Protection Throughout the novel, Holden seems to be excluded from and victimized by the world around him.

As he says to Mr. The truth is that interactions with other people usually confuse and overwhelm him, and his cynical sense of superiority serves as a type of self-protection. He never addresses his own emotions directly, nor does he attempt to discover the source of his troubles.

He desperately needs human contact and love, but his protective wall of bitterness prevents him from looking for such interaction.

SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye: Themes

For example, his loneliness propels him into his date with Sally Hayes, but his need for isolation causes him to insult her and drive her away. Similarly, he longs for the meaningful connection he once had with Jane Gallagher, but he is too frightened to make any real effort to contact her.

He depends upon his alienation, but it destroys him. While it is appropriate to discuss the novel in such terms, Holden Caulfield is an unusual protagonist for a bildungsroman because his central goal is to resist the process of maturity itself.

As his thoughts about the Museum of Natural History demonstrate, Holden fears change and is overwhelmed by complexity.

He wants everything to be easily understandable and eternally fixed, like the statues of Eskimos and Indians in the museum.

Nothing reveals his image of these two worlds better than his fantasy about the catcher in the rye: His created understandings of childhood and adulthood allow Holden to cut himself off from the world by covering himself with a protective armor of cynicism.

Antolini and Phoebe, reveal the shallowness of his conceptions. It is his catch-all for describing the superficiality, hypocrisy, pretension, and shallowness that he encounters in the world around him.Themes: The main ideas or messages of the work—usually abstract ideas about people, society, or life in general.

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A work may have many themes, which may be in tension with one another. Elements of Style. These are the hows—how the characters speak, how the story is constructed, and how language is used throughout the work.

Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes They Represent In J.

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D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and “phonies” while George Bernard Shaw’s main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to .

Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes They Represent In J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and "phonies" while George Bernard Shaw's main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to become a phony.

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Catcher in the Rye, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Like most teenagers, Holden struggles with his sexuality. He considers himself a "sex maniac," but is also completely inexperienced.

In The Catcher in the Rye, the major themes reflect the values and motivations of the characters. Some of these themes are outlined in the following sections. As its title indicates, the dominating theme of The Catcher in the Rye is the protection of innocence, especially of children.

Essay Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes They Represent In J.

Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes They Represent In J. D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and “phonies” while George Bernard Shaw’s main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to become a phony. The possible reason for this is that they both . The world today is very deceptive and phony. J. D. Salingers well known novels, The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zooey attack this fake and superficial society which is evident through the lives, ideas, actions, and words expressed by the characters in these literary pieces. Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes They Represent. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and "phonies" while George Bernard Shaw's main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to become a phony.

D. Salinger"s novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and "phonies" while George Bernard Shaw"s main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to become a phony.

A comparison of themes in the catcher in the rye and pygmalion
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